Inside the Red Cup: Why I'm Boycotting Starbucks

I’m. Ticked.  Like Really. Ticked.  

I can’t believe that Starbucks would do this.  Like this.  Without warning.  And at this time of year.  Right when my students feel generous - or more like think they can pad their grade - and they slip a little 5 or 10 spot into my mailbox or on my desk.  Knowing that I have a love affair with coffee.  Knowing that the hipster in me dreams in tall, grande and venti.  Knowing that the way to this teacher’s heart is a donut {or cupcake} and a piping hot cup of Seattle brew.

And now, I’m going to be forced to regift those treasured gift cards to others and forgo my love affair.  

It’s not fair, damn it.

It’s so. Not. Fair. That Starbucks changed their CHAI.  And now, my drink that I covet.  That I lust after.  That I dream about.  That I treat myself with on every major school activity Friday event.  My grande soy chai latte is forever changed.  

And is now disgusting.

I would drink it out of any color cup, even one with a logo for Bush for President {calm down, clearly the logo can be easily hidden with the cardboard slip they put around it so it won’t burn you}.  Because the cup doesn’t matter.  It’s what’s in it that that matters.

And right now, I don’t like what’s in it.

I guess that’s true of a lot of things lately.  Our society is so concerned about how we look on the outside that we forget it’s the contents that matter.  I believe it was MLK that  had a dream

"that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

And yet we are arming ourselves with judgment and hate and taking to the social media battlefield to politicize Christmas and dehumanize the plight of a people displaced because war, hatred, violence that has destroyed their home, country, faith.  We fight because we don’t agree or understand their beliefs.  Because we are afraid.  Fear drives every action, reaction, Facebook post or tweet.  

Because we only seem to care about what’s on the outside.  

That cup of coffee I do so enjoy looks pretty snazzy all dressed up in red.  It’s also a status thing.  You know, carrying around a $7 cup of coffee tells the world that I’m rich and hip and western.  And that’s all that matters, right?

Because what’s on the inside.  It’s disgusting.  And bitter.  And gag worthy.


But nobody sees that.  So I don’t have to worry.